Is There Anything We Can Do to Correct for the Fact That We’re All a Little Bit Prejudiced? 

New research on implicit bias offers some valuable insights on how it operates in negotiation settings—but also highlights the complicated ways it resists intervention.
Here’s the opening:
Debates over race and public policy in the United States are a bit odd from a social-psychological standpoint. They tend to focus on explicit racism, on who said what and whether it was offensive, rather than on the trickiest, most difficult to dislodge aspect of racism: implicit bias.

Researchers have known for years that racism is a lot more complicated than how a white person responds to a question about blacks. Rather, it affects judgment and decision making at a subconscious level, even among many otherwise egalitarian people, influencing how they decide who to trust and how they react to dangerous-seeming situations.

One new study, led by New York University psychology researchers Jeni Kubota and Elizabeth Phelps, offers some valuable new insights into how implicit bias operates in negotiation settings—but also highlights the complicated ways that bias resists behavioral interventions.

Read on here: Is There Anything We Can Do to Correct for the Fact That We’re All a Little Bit Prejudiced? – Pacific Standard

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