Celebrating the 60th Anniversary of the Courageous Black Domestic Workers Who Upheld the Montgomery Bus Boycott

Seventy years ago a black woman named Geneva Johnson was arrested on a Montgomery, Alabama public transit bus for allegedly having an incorrect bus fare and daring to display improper social decorum by “talking back” when the white driver scolded her. It was not uncommon for bus drivers to rob black riders at the pay meter. Historian Danielle McGuire notes: “Drivers shortchanged African Americans, then kicked them off the bus if they asked for correct change.” In the coming years, Montgomery would see the arrest of many more black women — Viola White, Claudette Colvin, Katie Wingfield — and even children who dared to challenge entrenched white power by violating the city’s segregation laws on the public bus lines through their refusal to vacate seating reserved for white passengers.

Read the rest here: Celebrating the 60th Anniversary of the Courageous Black Domestic Workers Who Upheld the Montgomery Bus Boycott

 

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