‘The Condition of Black Life Is One of Mourning’ – The New York Times

An excerpt:

 

“…I asked another friend what it’s like being the mother of a black son. ‘The condition of black life is one of mourning,’ she said bluntly. For her, mourning lived in real time inside her and her son’s reality: At any moment she might lose her reason for living. Though the white liberal imagination likes to feel temporarily bad about black suffering, there really is no mode of empathy that can replicate the daily strain of knowing that as a black person you can be killed for simply being black: no hands in your pockets, no playing music, no sudden movements, no driving your car, no walking at night, no walking in the day, no turning onto this street, no entering this building, no standing your ground, no standing here, no standing there, no talking back, no playing with toy guns, no living while black.”

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And Do You Belong? I Do – Saint Heron

From TheRoot.com:

On Friday evening, after an evening out with her husband and 11-year-old son, Solange Knowles went on a tweet storm about how she was treated at a Kraftwerk concert in New Orleans.

Knowles recounted how she was harassed by four white woman, and why black people never feel safe in white spaces.

“4 older white women yell to me from behind, ‘Sit down now’. I tell them I’m dancing at a concert. They yell, ‘u need to sit down now,’” Knowles posted on Twitter in a now-deleted tweet.

“We are at an ELECTRONIC and DANCE music concert and you are telling…not asking me…to sit down. In front of my child,” Knowles continued. She then went on to say that one of the women threw something at her back.

On Sunday, Solange wrote an essay titled, “And Do You Belong? I Do” on her personal website. She went into more details about the incident and how she commonly feels uncomfortable during certain events. 

 

An important read: And Do You Belong? I Do – Saint Heron

The Grace Jones Project – MoAD Museum of African Diaspora

 

The Grace Jones Project explores the influence of model, actress, and singer Grace Jones. The exhibition brings together more than twenty works by an intergenerational group of artists working primarily in photography, video, and performance. Some artists pay direct tribute to Jones while others demonstrate a Jones-like sensibility in their engagement with the black body …

Source: The Grace Jones Project – MoAD Museum of African Diaspora

How I Learned That Unapologetic Black Anger Can Change the World for the Better

An excerpt:

Ultimately, white folks’ fear of black anger is an act of psychological projection because White America would not tolerate for a moment the treatment that it routinely dispenses on black Americans and other people of color. Anger and upset at injustice and ill treatment are natural, human responses. Like any other people, black folks have a full range of emotions. Black America is asked to suppress and hide its anger; White America is rarely if ever asked to do the same thing.

For example, black America is asked to forgive and forget racial terrorism. White America never forgives or negotiates with terrorists. Instead, the United States hunts them down and kills with due haste and without apology.

White supremacy has forced black Americans, as a historic matter of survival, to wear a mask that is used to hide the full range of our emotions. In many ways, to publicly deny a full range of our emotion is a profoundly unnatural and unhealthy behavior. The mask also means that all too often, black justice claims are compromised, massaged, and repackaged as to avoid making white folks too uncomfortable. This is an act of surrender to white racial fragility and white privilege—moves that in the long-term accomplish little as power concedes nothing without a demand.

Source: How I Learned That Unapologetic Black Anger Can Change the World for the Better