A Brief History of White Privilege, Racism and Oppression in America | Legalize Democracy excerpt – YouTube

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415project – Stereotype and Stereotype Threat

Deconstructing Stereotype / Stereotype Threat: Moving Towards Being a More Culturally Responsive Teacher

 

Here are a series of resources that can quickly be shaped into mentoring activities to enhance understandings about the ways that stereotype and stereotype threat create inequities in the classroom. The assumption made in these materials is that we all maintain stereotypes to a certain degree, and that we must continually work to demythologize our lens to promote social justice in the classroom.

Source: 415project – Stereotype and Stereotype Threat

Communicating • Racial Equity Tools

Implicit bias is a concept based on an emerging body of cognitive and neural research. It identifies ways in which unconscious patterns people inevitably develop in their brains to organize information actually “affect individuals’ attitudes and actions, thus creating real-world implications, even though individuals may not even be aware that those biases exist within themselves.”  

This section shares implicit bias research and applications, as well as key sites and organizations.  It also includes a link to the Implicit Association test, an on-line tool for individual use. 

So here you go: a ton of resources on Implicit Bias ==> Communicating • Racial Equity Tools

What Makes Call-Out Culture So Toxic

Call-out culture refers to the tendency among progressives, radicals, activists, and community organizers to publicly name instances or patterns of oppressive behaviour and language use by others. People can be called out for statements and actions that are sexist, racist, ableist, and the list goes on. Because call-outs tend to be public, they can enable a particularly armchair and academic brand of activism: one in which the act of calling out is seen as an end in itself.

Read the rest here: What Makes Call-Out Culture So Toxic