Prince Wrote About Women in a Way That Most Contemporary Male Artists Still Can’t

Women usually exist in men’s songs as passive objects, which is to not exist at all. With Prince, they were addressed with awe and empathy.

Source: Prince Wrote About Women in a Way That Most Contemporary Male Artists Still Can’t

Advertisements

Back-to-School Night: A New Approach | Edutopia

Back-to-school night can be a time to shine light on the importance of social-emotional learning — at both home and school.

Source: Back-to-School Night: A New Approach | Edutopia

Manage Your Energy, Not Your Time | Greater Good

<a href=“http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0062344005?ie=UTF8&tag=gregooscicen-20&linkCode=as2&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=0062344005”>HarperOne, 2016, 224 pages</a>

The new book “The Happiness Track” explains how to use the science of happiness to preserve your energy and be more productive.

In The Happiness Track, Seppälä tries to untangle one of the knottiest problems of the modern age: our burned out, overscheduled lifestyle. We are stuck in a jumble of feeling overwhelmed yet never accomplishing enough, trussed up by the underlying assumptions that we hold about productivity:Success requires stress. We have to compete with others. We can’t cut ourselves any slack. “We have simply accepted overextension as a way of life,” she writes.

To combat this problem, the typical advice is to manage your time better: Prioritize. Make better to-do lists. Delegate unnecessary tasks. If that hasn’t worked for you, don’t be surprised; nature abhors a vacuum, and so do we. If we give ourselves an extra hour, we’ll find some task to fill it with. So time is not the commodity we should be tracking and managing, Seppälä argues. Instead, we need to manage our energy.

Seppälä outlines six qualities to cultivate that will contribute to both our productivity and our happiness. In effect, they’re also ways to boost energy without making big changes to our schedules.

Read about these six qualities here: Manage Your Energy, Not Your Time | Greater Good

Shared Identity | Practice | Greater Good in Action

One of the greatest barriers to altruism is group difference: we feel less motivated to help someone if they don’t seem to belong to our group. This exercise from the Greater Good in Action platform can help expand your sense of shared identity with others to boost your inner altruist. Learn more, accept the challenge, and read the “Why You Should Try It” page here: Shared Identity | Practice | Greater Good in Action.