Prince Wrote About Women in a Way That Most Contemporary Male Artists Still Can’t

Women usually exist in men’s songs as passive objects, which is to not exist at all. With Prince, they were addressed with awe and empathy.

Source: Prince Wrote About Women in a Way That Most Contemporary Male Artists Still Can’t

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How Job Listing Language Could Be Adding to Silicon Valley’s Gender Divide | News Fix | KQED News

Phrases like “work hard, play hard” or “maintaining control” appeal more to men, according to a recent analysis of more than 25,000 tech job ads.

Source: How Job Listing Language Could Be Adding to Silicon Valley’s Gender Divide | News Fix | KQED News

Why We Say Latinx: Trans & Gender Non-Conforming People Explain

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Has the word “Latinx” ever come across your Facebook, Twitter or Instagram? The letter “x,” instead of say an “o” or an “a,” is not a typo. In fact, that final letter is very intentional.

The “x” makes Latino, a masculine identifier, gender-neutral. It also moves beyond Latin@ – which has been used in the past to include both masculine and feminine identities – to encompass genders outside of that limiting man-woman binary.

Latinx, pronounced “La-teen-ex,” includes the numerous people of Latin American descent whose gender identities fluctuate along different points of the spectrum, from agender or nonbinary to gender non-conforming, genderqueer and genderfluid.

But don’t take our word for it. Here’s why people who identify as Latinx resonate with the term: Why We Say Latinx: Trans & Gender Non-Conforming People Explain