Pink Wasn’t Always Girly – The Atlantic

A short history of a complex color: Pink Wasn’t Always Girly – The Atlantic

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Why We Say Latinx: Trans & Gender Non-Conforming People Explain

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Has the word “Latinx” ever come across your Facebook, Twitter or Instagram? The letter “x,” instead of say an “o” or an “a,” is not a typo. In fact, that final letter is very intentional.

The “x” makes Latino, a masculine identifier, gender-neutral. It also moves beyond Latin@ – which has been used in the past to include both masculine and feminine identities – to encompass genders outside of that limiting man-woman binary.

Latinx, pronounced “La-teen-ex,” includes the numerous people of Latin American descent whose gender identities fluctuate along different points of the spectrum, from agender or nonbinary to gender non-conforming, genderqueer and genderfluid.

But don’t take our word for it. Here’s why people who identify as Latinx resonate with the term: Why We Say Latinx: Trans & Gender Non-Conforming People Explain

I’m Proof Bathroom Bills Are Not Just a Transgender Issue | TIME

An excerpt:

What these “bathroom bills” are actually about is enforcing traditional gender codes and norms in an increasingly diverse and shifting America. Single-sex restrooms just like single-sex dormitories have always been rooted in compulsory heteronormativity and the sense that we have to protect women from men who can’t expect to be reigned in. This still echoes today, as when an all-male elite club at Harvard University suggested that allowing women to join would increase the potential for sexual assault. And notice that no one seems to worry about pedophiles being forced to use the little boy’s room instead. The point is that girls need protecting.

Read the rest here: I’m Proof Bathroom Bills Are Not Just a Transgender Issue | TIME