SFGMC Sings In Solidarity #WeAreOrlando

 

“Dedication”
Music by Richard Burchard
Text by Mark Twain, adapted from a poem by Robert Richardson

Warm summer sun,
shine brightly here,
Warm Southern wind,
blow softly here,
Green sod above,
lie light, lie light,
Good night, dear heart;
good night, good night.

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I’m Proof Bathroom Bills Are Not Just a Transgender Issue | TIME

An excerpt:

What these “bathroom bills” are actually about is enforcing traditional gender codes and norms in an increasingly diverse and shifting America. Single-sex restrooms just like single-sex dormitories have always been rooted in compulsory heteronormativity and the sense that we have to protect women from men who can’t expect to be reigned in. This still echoes today, as when an all-male elite club at Harvard University suggested that allowing women to join would increase the potential for sexual assault. And notice that no one seems to worry about pedophiles being forced to use the little boy’s room instead. The point is that girls need protecting.

Read the rest here: I’m Proof Bathroom Bills Are Not Just a Transgender Issue | TIME

Stop Saying “That’s So Gay!”: 6 Types of Microaggressions That Harm LGBTQ People – Psychology Benefits Society

In retrospect, I had a very difficult time accepting my gay identity, because of the microaggressions that I experienced throughout my life.  Microaggressions are the everyday encounters of subtle discrimination that people of various marginalized groups experience throughout their lives (Sue et al., 2007).  Some microaggressions are unconscious (i.e., the perpetrator doesn’t even know they did something) while some microaggressions may be unintentional (i.e., the perpetrator may be aware of their actions, but may not realize the negative impact they may have on people).

One of the reasons why it was important for me to study microaggressions against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer and questioning (LGBTQ) people was because I knew that this type of discrimination existed and because I hypothesized that they had a significant impact on the lives of LGBTQ people, particularly on their mental health and identity development. I collaborated with two fellow psychologist colleagues, Dr. David Rivera and Dr. Melissa Corpus, and we theorized the various types of microaggressions that affect LGBTQ people (see Nadal et al., 2010). For the past several years, my research team and I interviewed all kinds of LGBTQ people and they all reported that microaggressions are very common in their lives.

Here are a few examples:

Source: Stop Saying “That’s So Gay!”: 6 Types of Microaggressions That Harm LGBTQ People – Psychology Benefits Society