Communicating • Racial Equity Tools

Implicit bias is a concept based on an emerging body of cognitive and neural research. It identifies ways in which unconscious patterns people inevitably develop in their brains to organize information actually “affect individuals’ attitudes and actions, thus creating real-world implications, even though individuals may not even be aware that those biases exist within themselves.”  

This section shares implicit bias research and applications, as well as key sites and organizations.  It also includes a link to the Implicit Association test, an on-line tool for individual use. 

So here you go: a ton of resources on Implicit Bias ==> Communicating • Racial Equity Tools

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Color Blind or Just Plain Blind?

This is such a good read (and so affirming for POC who live in SF/Bay Area). #whiteliberalracism #blindspots

Please read: Color Blind or Just Plain Blind? by John F. Dovidio and Samuel L.Gaertner (ignore the alert at the top of the page about content that has been moved, and keep reading).

 

My favorite bit is the conclusion’s first bullet:

So what can we each do about racism when we don’t know what we don’t know yet? Here are some simple (but not easy) suggestions for action.

• When a person of color brings up race as an issue in an interpersonal or organizational setting—listen! If the person indicates he or she is offended, don’t be defensive. Instead try to understand the other person’s perspective on the issue. Remember your perceptions can be very different from the everyday experience of others. As the data indicate, whites tend to underestimate the impact of discrimination. Do not begin talking quickly, explain why they are misinterpreting the situation, or begin crying. These are some of the most infuriating responses people of color encounter when they challenge a situation that feels wrong. Take time, if you need it, to think about the situation after listening fully to the other person’s perspective. If you hear problems third-hand, don’t get angry because you were not approached directly. You probably need to talk through the situation at some point, but remember it is almost never completely safe for a person of color to challenge a dominant perception. Listen deeply.

 

 

 

 

 

CSI’s Guide on Implicit Bias | Center for Social Inclusion

At the Center for Social Inclusion (CSI), we are lifting up research like studies on implicit bias to show how race still matters in this country. We are also testing messages to help us all talk about race more constructively. We must all work together to build a more perfect union by creating more opportunity for communities of color and white communities that need more opportunities. We put together a quick guide for those of you who want to know more about implicit bias. This guide showcases important work by many different groups and researchers.

Source: CSI’s Guide on Implicit Bias | Center for Social Inclusion

Communicating • Racial Equity Tools

Implicit bias is a concept based on an emerging body of cognitive and neural research. It identifies ways in which unconscious patterns people inevitably develop in their brains to organize information actually “affect individuals’ attitudes and actions, thus creating real-world implications, even though individuals may not even be aware that those biases exist within themselves.”

 

Source: Communicating • Racial Equity Tools