Police are Killing Native Americans at Higher Rate than Any Race, and Nobody is Talking About It – The Free Thought Project

Let’s talk about it…

 

tkAmericans are up in arms right now over the near epidemic number of deaths of African-American at the hands of police, and rightfully so. African-Americans make up only 13 percent of the population, yet they are the victims in 26 percent of all police shootings. That is nearly 3 times the rate of whites.

Read on: Police are Killing Native Americans at Higher Rate than Any Race, and Nobody is Talking About It – The Free Thought Project

John Trudell, Outspoken Advocate for American Indians, Is Dead at 69 – The New York Times

 

 

This is American history, y’all.

AND it’s San Francisco/Bay Area history.

May you rest in power, John Trudell.

Mr. Trudell was a leading advocate of Native American rights who channeled his message of righteous defiance into poetry and songwriting.

John Trudell, Outspoken Advocate for American Indians, Is Dead at 69 – The New York Times

Thangs Taken: rethinking thanksgiving | Ariel Luckey

There’s a a wonderful, powerful event coming up that I want to highlight: Thangs Taken: rethinking thanksgiving | Ariel Luckey.

Save the Date: Sunday, November 22, 2015

Click on the link for details, a list of artists and activists who will be at the event.

Thangs Taken: rethinking thanksgiving is an annual cultural arts event that brings artists, activists and communities together to explore the complex history of Thanksgiving and to acknowledge the legacy of U.S. colonialism and genocide against Native Americans. Produced by the Free Land Project and curated and hosted by Ariel Luckey, Thangs Taken features live music, dance, film, spoken word poetry, hip hop theater and visual art installations from Native and non-Native artists. Grounded in grassroots activism, Thangs Taken also features leaders from local social and environmental justice organizations to provide information on current campaigns and concrete ways to take action in the community. With the arts at the center, people from diverse backgrounds gather to engage in critical dialogue and to stand in the power of our collective ability to create a world based in peace and justice that we can truly be thankful for.

Each year Thangs Taken raises hundreds of dollars for a specific community organization or campaign. Past events have benefited the Ohlone Shellmound Walk, the Longest Walk 2, the Winnemem Wintu Tribe, the Indigenous Delegation to Palestine and the Hintil Ku Caa Preschool in Oakland. Celebrating our common humanity and the legacy of resistance to colonization, we create a circle of prayers, poems, pictures, songs, stories and movement.

 

Again, more info here: Thangs Taken: rethinking thanksgiving | Ariel Luckey.

 

Celebrating Native American & Aboriginal Mighty Girls for Native American Heritage Month / A Mighty Girl | A Mighty Girl

By Katherine Handcock, A Mighty Girl Communications Specialist

“When I was a little girl I was taught that there were no Indians. The only time I ever saw Indians was when we visited the stupid natural history museum and they were dead and stuffed like the dinosaurs…. [When Sesame Street] called me up and said that they wanted me to recite the alphabet like everybody else does, and count from one to ten….I said that I wasn’t interested in doing that, but I asked if they had ever done any Native American programming…. I was doing essentially the same thing that I was doing all along, in trying to raise consciousness and spotlight Native America, because it’s fascinating and interesting.” — Buffy Saint-Marie, Canadian-American Cree songwriter, educator, and social activist, in an interview with Confessions of a Pop Culture Addict, June 2009

 

Buffy Sainte-Marie’s episodes of Sesame Street started airing in 1975, but sadly, representation of Native American and Aboriginal peoples in media — especially children’s media — continues to be rare. In fact, in a 2012 study by the Cooperative Children’s Book Center of 3,600 children’s books, less than 1% of them featured Native American or Aboriginal characters. Fortunately, there are some great books available featuring Native American and Aboriginal Canadian Mighty Girls! November is Native American Heritage Month in the United States, during which time we recognize the contributions and cultures of the aboriginal peoples of North America. To celebrate this heritage month, we’ve put together a selection of wonderful books starring Native American and Aboriginal to share with your children. Whether reading a great piece of historical fiction, a fascinating biography, or a story that features modern Native American girls in their day-to-day lives, they’ll love these stories. And who knows? You might just learn a thing or two yourself!

For more reading recommendations for children and teens, visit our Native American and Aboriginal book section.

Source: Celebrating Native American & Aboriginal Mighty Girls for Native American Heritage Month / A Mighty Girl | A Mighty Girl