Parable of the Polygons – a playable post on the shape of society

How harmless choices can make a harmful world:

Parable of the Polygons – a playable post on the shape of society

Is There Anything We Can Do to Correct for the Fact That We’re All a Little Bit Prejudiced? 

New research on implicit bias offers some valuable insights on how it operates in negotiation settings—but also highlights the complicated ways it resists intervention.
Here’s the opening:
Debates over race and public policy in the United States are a bit odd from a social-psychological standpoint. They tend to focus on explicit racism, on who said what and whether it was offensive, rather than on the trickiest, most difficult to dislodge aspect of racism: implicit bias.

Researchers have known for years that racism is a lot more complicated than how a white person responds to a question about blacks. Rather, it affects judgment and decision making at a subconscious level, even among many otherwise egalitarian people, influencing how they decide who to trust and how they react to dangerous-seeming situations.

One new study, led by New York University psychology researchers Jeni Kubota and Elizabeth Phelps, offers some valuable new insights into how implicit bias operates in negotiation settings—but also highlights the complicated ways that bias resists behavioral interventions.

Read on here: Is There Anything We Can Do to Correct for the Fact That We’re All a Little Bit Prejudiced? – Pacific Standard

If you care about this week at Mizzou, you need to know the story of the Black 14 – The Washington Post

“Mel Hamilton would still wrap the black band around his arm on Oct. 17, 1969, the day that altered his life and so many others. He regrets nothing, except perhaps not taking his fight further. It cost him his spot on the Wyoming football team. It led to four decades of finger-pointing and accusations and racism, he said. Hamilton knows he made the right decision when he sees the pride on his children’s faces when they talk about what he did.”

Read on here: If you care about this week at Mizzou, you need to know the story of the Black 14 – The Washington Post

Humans are wired for prejudice, but that doesn’t have to be the end of the story

Here’s why I believe classes like Cultural Competency and Identity & Ethnic Studies in high schools are so vital: “…studies support the notion that childhood exposure to diversity can reduce the salience of race in adulthood.”

Read the article here: Humans are wired for prejudice but that doesn’t have to be the end of the story

“Humans are highly social creatures. Our brains have evolved to allow us to survive and thrive in complex social environments. Accordingly, the behaviors and emotions that help us navigate our social sphere…”