Don’t Say Nothing | Teaching Tolerance – Diversity, Equity and Justice

“We may be uncomfortable talking about race, but we can no longer afford to be silent. We have chosen a profession, which—like parenting—requires that our comforts come second to those of children.”

Don’t Say Nothing | Teaching Tolerance – Diversity, Equity and Justice

 

How to Uphold White Supremacy by Focusing on Diversity and Inclusion by Kẏra | Model View Culture

An excerpt:

Diversity is the practice of mixing together different bodies within a common organization, and is a prime resource to be capitalized upon by businesses and organizations that are white owned and/or operated. Diversity still benefits those in power by taking advantage of the various experiences and vantage points of different racial/gender/sexual backgrounds. Rather than respecting difference and redistributing power based on it, diversity only “celebrates” difference in order to exploit multiculturalism for its economic value.

So why do so many people seeking racial justice, female empowerment, and queer liberation still choose to advocate for “diversity” and “inclusion”? They appeal to liberalism. They prevent oppression from being named. They prevent us from speaking truth to power. They make progress sound friendly to those in power. Companies can tokenize women and people of color throughout their advertising. They can get way more credit than they deserve for being not 100% white men. They can profit from the increases in efficiency and productivity associated with more diversity. All of the above ignore the fact that companies needed to have diversity initiatives to make them less overwhelmingly white in the first place; that white people are the ones in the position of being able to grant access in the first place. When we work for justice and liberation, we can’t accept progress that is conditional on being economically beneficial.

Read the rest here: How to Uphold White Supremacy by Focusing on Diversity and Inclusion by Kẏra | Model View Culture

Song Review: Macklemore’s ‘White Privilege II’ Supports ‘Black Lives Matter’ Admirably and Insufferably – The Atlantic

What is it that makes such good intentions so hard to listen to?

Song Review: Macklemore’s ‘White Privilege II’ Supports ‘Black Lives Matter’ Admirably and Insufferably – The Atlantic

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Here is another article/opinion on “White Privilege II”:

Macklemore’s white, complex — ‘White Privilege II’ won’t save black lives, but that’s OK

 

 

Parable of the Polygons – a playable post on the shape of society

How harmless choices can make a harmful world:

Parable of the Polygons – a playable post on the shape of society

4 Ways to Push Back Against Your Privilege – BGD

I am sharing this because the Cultural Competency class ends with a panel on privilege, privilege awareness, and some examples of how to use our privilege(s) constructively, for good, for social justice.

As an educator who believes in calling people in rather than calling them out, I sometimes hesitate to share articles that have a calling-out vibe/tone (see #3 in this article). At the same time, the message is worth sharing, and I also want to avoid tone-policing because as a relatively light skinned, “ambiguously ethnic” immigrant, I have many privileges. Perhaps had I spent a lifetime rather than half a lifetime in this country as a darker skinned person, I would be more curt in my tone, too, especially if I were a writer for an online journal and not a high school teacher.

Aaaaanyhow.

Read on and let me know what you think in the comments section if you feel so moved. Oh, and this isn’t just for white folks; it’s also for anyone in dominant groups in terms of socioeconomic status, gender identity, gender expression, sexual orientation, nationality/citizenship, age, ability/able bodiedness, religion,…etc.

 

 

4 Ways to Push Back Against Your Privilege – BGD

 

The Troubling Gap Between Awareness of Prejudice and Support for Action 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Studies show that white people do, in fact, have a higher threshold for admitting that something constitutes racism, along with an inferior ability to identify structural racism. A recent study also found that being in a position of power makes people more likely to recognize that they are being treated unfairly. If the powerful or privileged recognize relatively more unfairness in their own lives, they’re likely to see relatively less unfairness in the lives of minorities.”

Read the entire article here: The Troubling Gap Between Awareness of Prejudice and Support for Action – Pacific Standard

 

tk: This is a thought-provoking article to consider re: our dominant group identities. Personally, it also helped me understand more about some people’s opinions on rioting and the criticism Black Lives Matter activists have recently received for taking direct action.