6 Ways Well-Intentioned People Whitesplain Racism (And Why They Need to Stop)

If you don’t believe whitesplaining is wrong, then you’re missing how the motivation behind whitesplaining is influenced by white supremacy. So let’s unpack the most common reasons why whitesplaining happens, to examine why it’s so misguided.

Source: 6 Ways Well-Intentioned People Whitesplain Racism (And Why They Need to Stop)

Race/Related

 

 

The great-grandfather of Rochell Sanders Prater was a slave sold by Jesuit priests to help keep Georgetown University afloat. She shared family photos, including one of her grandmother’s house. Her father is in the photo at right, wearing glasses. Andrew Spear for The New York Times.

 

Read on here.

 

Don’t Say Nothing | Teaching Tolerance – Diversity, Equity and Justice

“We may be uncomfortable talking about race, but we can no longer afford to be silent. We have chosen a profession, which—like parenting—requires that our comforts come second to those of children.”

Don’t Say Nothing | Teaching Tolerance – Diversity, Equity and Justice

 

Facing Race Issues In the Classroom: How To Connect With Students | MindShift | KQED News

Students’ racial identities play a big part in how they approach classroom relationships and learning, and teachers can learn strategies to make all their students feel comfortable and capable of learning.

Source: Facing Race Issues In the Classroom: How To Connect With Students | MindShift | KQED News

Color Blind or Just Plain Blind?

This is such a good read (and so affirming for POC who live in SF/Bay Area). #whiteliberalracism #blindspots

Please read: Color Blind or Just Plain Blind? by John F. Dovidio and Samuel L.Gaertner (ignore the alert at the top of the page about content that has been moved, and keep reading).

 

My favorite bit is the conclusion’s first bullet:

So what can we each do about racism when we don’t know what we don’t know yet? Here are some simple (but not easy) suggestions for action.

• When a person of color brings up race as an issue in an interpersonal or organizational setting—listen! If the person indicates he or she is offended, don’t be defensive. Instead try to understand the other person’s perspective on the issue. Remember your perceptions can be very different from the everyday experience of others. As the data indicate, whites tend to underestimate the impact of discrimination. Do not begin talking quickly, explain why they are misinterpreting the situation, or begin crying. These are some of the most infuriating responses people of color encounter when they challenge a situation that feels wrong. Take time, if you need it, to think about the situation after listening fully to the other person’s perspective. If you hear problems third-hand, don’t get angry because you were not approached directly. You probably need to talk through the situation at some point, but remember it is almost never completely safe for a person of color to challenge a dominant perception. Listen deeply.